https://journalajgr.com/index.php/AJGR/issue/feed Asian Journal of Geographical Research 2024-06-02T12:55:20+00:00 Asian Journal of Geographical Research contact@journalajgr.com Open Journal Systems <p><strong>Asian Journal of Geographical Research</strong> <strong>(ISSN: 2582-2985) </strong>aims to publish high-quality papers (<a href="https://journalajgr.com/index.php/AJGR/general-guideline-for-authors">Click here for Types of paper</a>) in all areas of Geography and Earth Science. By not excluding papers based on novelty, this journal facilitates the research and wishes to publish papers as long as they are technically correct and scientifically motivated. The journal also encourages the submission of useful reports of negative results. This is a quality controlled, OPEN peer-reviewed, open-access INTERNATIONAL journal.</p> https://journalajgr.com/index.php/AJGR/article/view/226 Drivers of Carbon Emissions in Kenya: The Perspective of Technology 2024-04-06T09:45:44+00:00 Naftaly Mose brilliantcoke@gmail.com Michael Fumey Edwin Kipchirchir <p>The empirical studies have portrayed from a different perspective that technology, foreign direct investment (FDI), and economic growth have diverse outcomes on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. African economies specifically Kenya are currently threatened with more CO2 emissions for which proper strategies need to be adopted to reduce and mitigate this situation. To address this issue, the Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) technique was utilized, differentiating between the long-term and short-term effects of drivers of CO2. Granger causality was applied to analyze the causality between the series. The study uses time series data for Kenya from 1990 to 2022. The short-run and long-run results indicate a negative relationship between technology and carbon emissions. Specifically, an increase in technology reduces carbon emissions while an increase in economic growth and FDI inflow increases carbon emissions. The study has identified the negative nexus between technology and carbon emissions in Kenya. This means that technological innovation can increase labour productivity and utilization of resources, thereby reducing carbon emissions. Therefore, Kenya should increase research and utilization of low and efficient carbon technologies to decouple economic growth from environmental pollution. Based on the result, various strategies have been proposed, including using different clean technologies to produce renewable fuels. FDI that complies with environmental regulations, and the use of advanced green and clean technologies can help mitigate the negative impact of technological progress on the environment. Additionally, technological progress, particularly in information and communication technology, will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve environmental quality.</p> 2024-04-06T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2024 Author(s). The licensee is the journal publisher. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. https://journalajgr.com/index.php/AJGR/article/view/228 GIS-Based Analytical Hierarchy Process Modelling and Mapping of Erosion Vulnerability in the Coastal Areas of Rivers State, Nigeria 2024-04-24T13:13:59+00:00 Igbokwe, J.I Obasohan, J.N Igbokwe, E.C <p>The problem of coastal erosion in rivers State Nigeria is a significant issue that has far-reaching consequences for the environment and local communities. Despite the efforts of previous research there remains a lack of comprehensive understanding of the factors contributing to erosion vulnerability and their relative importance, hindering effective decision-making and management practices aimed at mitigating the effects of coastal erosion in Rivers State. Therefore, this study aimed at a GIS-based analytical hierarchy process modeling and mapping of coastal erosion vulnerability in Rivers State, Nigeria. The objectives are to establish and classify the geophysical factors according to the levels of coastal erosion risk, calculate the reliability index of the classified geophysical factors, determine the coastal vulnerable areas across Rivers State using analytical hierarchical process and to produce a coastal vulnerability index map defining the extent of erosion vulnerability in Rivers State. The methodology comprises of the acquisition of primary and secondary data, image pre-processing, image classification, DEM processing, classification and standardization of factors, development of pairwise comparism, and weighted linear combination analysis. The study revealed three distinct coastal erosion vulnerability zones: high, moderate, and low vulnerability. The high vulnerability zone encompassed a total expanse of 545.29 square kilometers, constituting 6.38% of the study area. In contrast, the moderate and low vulnerability zones covered 1941.33 square kilometers and 6052.51 square kilometers, respectively, making up 22.73% and 70.89% of the total area. Bonny (139.28 sq km) was ranked as the most vulnerable due to its role as an oil and gas hub. Degema (111.28 sq km) ranked second and requires urgent erosion control. Okrika and Andoni (71.73 sq km and 62.20 sq km) were third and fourth respectively. It is recommended that an advocate for the systematic approach to coastal vulnerability zoning be introduced in the study. The categorization of areas into high, moderate, and low vulnerability zones provides a standardized framework for assessing coastal regions' susceptibility to erosion. This approach can be applied to other regions to facilitate consistent vulnerability assessments.</p> 2024-04-24T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2024 Author(s). The licensee is the journal publisher. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. https://journalajgr.com/index.php/AJGR/article/view/229 Transformation of Agriculture in Damoh District of Madhya Pradesh 2024-05-07T08:10:26+00:00 Vinay Kumar Verma vinayvkv1978@gmail.com <p>India has been considered as a land of villages and from very beginning agriculture has been main means of livelihood of the residents of the country specially people living in rural areas. Agriculture plays a vital role in the nation's economy. About two third of the working population earn their living through agriculture and agriculture sector contributes about 26 per cent in the gross domestic production of the country. The present study examines the transformation of the various dimension of the agriculture in the Damoh district of Madhya Pradesh based on secondary data. With the growing pressure of population, demand for land for non-agricultural activities, implementations of rural development programmes and activities, the land use pattern, cropping pattern, irrigational facilities, farming techniques and other allied activities in the study area has transformed during the period 1990 to 2020. Damoh district is located in the Bundelkhand region of Madhya Pradesh and is part of Sagar division. Total geographical area of the district is 7306 sq.km. out of which 323386 hectares land is available for cultivation with 293599 hectares of irrigated land. The proportion of forest and fallow land has decreased in last two decades while the proportion of net shown area, other uncultivated land, land not available for agriculture and double cropped area has increased during the period. The cropping pattern of the study region, also transformed. The use of modern agricultural implements, fertilizers and pesticides too has increased during 1990-2020.</p> 2024-05-07T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2024 Author(s). The licensee is the journal publisher. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. https://journalajgr.com/index.php/AJGR/article/view/230 Urban Growth Dynamics of National Capital Region of India Using Geospatial Technology 2024-05-19T08:19:36+00:00 Nikhil Tiwari Parag Jyoti Kashyap kashyapparagjyoti@gmail.com <p>The urban growth refers to the movement of people from rural areas to urban areas, where there is a higher level of human population, economic activity, infrastructure, and significant expansion of land use. Urban growth is closely related to urbanization. In the National Capital Region (NCR), unplanned growth is one of the main problems. These obstacles limit the prospects for economic expansion. So, the study area of this research is the NCR of India. The study is based on the growth of urban areas from 1901 to 2011. The data is taken from the Census of India, Registrar General, and Census Commissioner, New Delhi. It has counted the total towns and population in Delhi, NCR, since 1901 and 2011. The District Census Handbook has been used for the collection of urban population and total population data for that district. Google Earth Pro has been used for the kml format of towns. ArcGIS 10.7 software has been used for mapping purposes. The number of towns has increased from 1901 to 2011. There have been found 182 towns in 2011. The towns also show positive and negative growth from 1901 to 2011. The maximum growth of towns was found after the liberalization period. The maximum growth of towns has been found in the Uttar Pradesh sub region. And most of the towns have transformed into urban regions.</p> 2024-05-19T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2024 Author(s). The licensee is the journal publisher. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. https://journalajgr.com/index.php/AJGR/article/view/231 Climatic Variations and Challenges to Socio-economic Development amongst Mbororo Communities in Mbum Plateau, North West Region of Cameroon 2024-05-23T13:19:47+00:00 Ngwani Awudu ngwaniawudu@gmail.com Funwi Godlove Ngwa Suiven John Paul Yinkfu Randy Ngeh Roland Nformi <p>This study sets out to investigate the challenges hindering Mbororo sources of livelihood in Mbum Plateau, North West Region of Cameroon. Explanatory research was used where it specify the nature and direction of the relationships between the studied variables. The study used mixed methods of qualitative and quantitative approaches. The study employed the primary and secondary data sources to bring out realistic results. Rainfall Seasonality Index (SI) and Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) were employed to assess the vulnerability of the agro-hydrological system to climate variation. The major primary data sources used were field survey, interviews and questionnaires. A total of 200 questionnaires were distributed using stratified random and snow ball sampling techniques. The data obtained was complemented by secondary sources from published and unpublished materials. Data collected during the field survey were analyzed through two statistical techniques. The qualitative data obtained was analyzed through the content analysis whereas themes and codes were given to the different opinions and perceptions of the informants and their frequencies and percentages were being determined from there. Data were presented in tables, charts, maps, and graphs with some attempted interpretations. Data were analyzed using the chi-square and multiple regression models. The findings revealed that climate variability, dwindling pasture and low streams discharge are having negative effects on Mbororo communities. It was observed from satellite images that, land use over the years has been changing with reducing aerial extent and quality of pasture, reducing water points in Mbum Plateau. In order to adapt the decreasing cattle numbers on the side of the Mborroro, they have taken farming, diving, hawking arm rubbery, and schooling as new livelihoods sustenance. The study recommends a sustainable pastoral activity by encouraging the introduction of drought resistant cattle species, Bracharia and Guatemala grass to supplement the natural pasture. MINEPAI should regularly control herd size so as to ensure ecosystem balance and avoid overgrazing. Transhumance tracts and areas should be well demarcated to avoid frequent farmer-grazers’ conflicts and frequent cattle theft observed in the region.</p> 2024-05-23T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2024 Author(s). The licensee is the journal publisher. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. https://journalajgr.com/index.php/AJGR/article/view/233 The Impact of Community Participation Modes on Watershed Degradation in Upper Gucha, Kenya 2024-05-30T11:29:27+00:00 Zablon Araka Kepha zablonkepha18@gmail.com Wilfred Ochieng Omollo Norah Moige Nyaiyo <p>Community participation as a strategy has been successful in controlling watershed degradation. Despite this, there remains a lack of understanding on the mode of participation that influences positive community participation and enhancing proper watershed management. The objectives of the study were: to assess the modes of community participation on watershed management in upper Gucha, to examine the extent of degradation and to determine the relationship between the modes of participation and the extent of watershed degradation in the study area. Descriptive survey design was used. The study area is in Upper Gucha watershed, Kisii County, Kenya. The study was conducted between, February 2023, to March 2024. The methodology used included: Mapping and delineating the watershed boundaries using Google Earth satellite images of 2023, determining the sampling frame using Google Earth map and ArcGIS version 10.5 software, selecting the sample size of 354 household heads using simple random sampling with replacement method, collecting data using questionnaires and photograph taking, analyzing data using descriptive statistical methods such as mean, frequency, standard deviation and spearman’s correlation analysis. Questionnaires return rate was 99.71%, representing an excellent response. 52.4% of the respondents were female while 47.6% were male. The results revealed that, the community rarely participated in the selected indicators of modes of community participation (M=2.0347, SD=0.89478). The extent of watershed degradation was moderate (M=3.056, SD=0.576). Further, a positive significant correlation was observed between the mode of community participation and the extent of watershed degradation (<em>P</em> =.00). In conclusion, the study results signifies lack of collaboration of all stakeholders and community engagement in watershed conservation efforts thus the cause of degradation in the study area.</p> 2024-05-30T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2024 Author(s). The licensee is the journal publisher. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. https://journalajgr.com/index.php/AJGR/article/view/234 An Assessment of the Downstream Effect of Dams on Livelihood Vulnerability of Riparian Dwellers: A Case of Mukutmanipur Dam, Kangsabati River, Eastern India 2024-06-02T12:55:20+00:00 Dipendu Pal kankutia2017@gmail.com Manjari Bhattacharji <p>The present study investigates the downstream impacts of Mukutmanipur dam on livelihood vulnerability by using the livelihood vulnerability index (LVI) based on 7 components and 26 sub-components. Stratified random sampling together with purposive sampling methods has been used to collect primary data on the components. Information on socio-demographic profile of selected 367 sample households were collected together with data on livelihood strategies, water, health, food, social networks and natural disaster status. The contributing factors (exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity) were integrated to estimate the livelihood vulnerability index using LVI-IPCC approaches. For assessing the livelihood vulnerability index, the stretch of the river channel under investigation has been divided into 24 equal segments using 25 cross sections. Morphological changes in each of these segments have been assessed and on the basis of the intensity of morphological changes the segments have been grouped into three morphological change areas i.e. high, moderate and low. Results suggest that people living in areas of the high intensity of morphological change (LVI: 0.407) are more vulnerable to livelihood uncertainties than those living in areas of moderate (LVI: 0.341) and low intensity of morphological change (LVI: 0291). This study recommends that special emphasize should be given to peoples in the vulnerable areas on the implementation of various government and non-government scheme for the betterment of their lives and livelihoods.</p> 2024-06-02T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2024 Author(s). The licensee is the journal publisher. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.